Conservation

Sharks are testing positive for cocaineGreat-White-Shark-Jump.jpg

Sharks are testing positive for cocaine

Fish ingesting microplastics is bad enough, but new analysis points to additional humanmade issues. According to a study published on July 15 in Science of the Total Environment, researchers at Brazil’s Oswaldo Cruz Foundation have confirmed trace amounts of cocaine and its main metabolite, benzoylecgonine, in at least 13 Brazilian sharpnose sharks purchased from commercial […]

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There's a right and wrong way to build a solar farmSolar-Farm.jpg

There’s a right and wrong way to build a solar farm

Solar farm naysayers often throw out two major criticisms of power utility-scale projects, depending on where they are located: Solar farms intended for relatively flat, well-draining land can take up much-needed and valuable agricultural spaces. Meanwhile, any solar farms installed across more complex terrain or steeper slopes may exacerbate issues like excessive stormwater runoff and

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106 critically endangered Siamese crocodile eggs spotted in Cambodiacrocs-hatching.png

106 critically endangered Siamese crocodile eggs spotted in Cambodia

In a conservation victory, 106 eggs belonging to rare Siamese crocodiles (Crocodylus siamensis) were recently discovered in Cambodia’s Cardamom National Park. Sixty of the eggs have successfully hatched since they were found. According to conservation organization Fauna & Flora, this number sets a century-long breeding record for this critically endangered reptile. “The recent discovery of

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Expedition finds a 10-inch long millipede lost to science for 126 yearslost-millipede.jpg

Expedition finds a 10-inch long millipede lost to science for 126 years

An expedition into Madagascar’s largest and most intact forest found 21 species that had been considered lost to science. A team studying the Makira Forest found three iridescent, nearly translucent species of fish and the first documented sighting of a roughly 10-inch-long millipede in 126 years. However, the dark brown millipede was likely never considered

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Dragonflies reveal how toxic mercury moves in natureDragonfly-Flower.jpg

Dragonflies reveal how toxic mercury moves in nature

Ecologists often rely on health data of fish and bird populations to measure a region’s mercury contamination. But this analysis can be expensive, time consuming, and exclude many desert ecosystems. Yet, one creature is easily found in almost any habitat that contains even minimal amounts of water—dragonflies. Now, after enlisting volunteers to gather the insects’

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Ssssso many snakes: Watch a ‘mega-den’ of rattlesnakes in real timerattlesnake-cam.png

Ssssso many snakes: Watch a ‘mega-den’ of rattlesnakes in real time

A group of rattlesnake researchers from California Polytechnic State University (Cal Poly) have installed a camera system called the RattleCam at a “mega-den” of rattlesnakes in Colorado. The cameras live stream the footage to YouTube and offer a new look into a very rare habitat. This mega-den attracts hundreds of rattlesnakes due to its geologic

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Hunters' bullets are poisoning bald eaglesbald-eagle.jpg

Hunters’ bullets are poisoning bald eagles

After reaching critically endangered population levels in the mid-20th century, bald eagles continue to steadily rebound across the US. But hunters still pose a major problem for America’s mascot—it’s not the poaching, necessarily, but their bullets used on other animals. Specifically, lead ammunition. According to a 2022 study published in Journal of Wildlife Management, bald

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A new armadillo species was hiding in plain sightarmadillo-new.jpg

A new armadillo species was hiding in plain sight

They’re scaly, covered in armor, and hiding a secret identity. Nine-banded armadillos (Dasypus novemcinctus), the idiosyncratic mammal that spans from southern Illinois to northern Argentina, are not actually one species after all. Instead, the group of these unusual animals is made up of four distinct species, according to a study published in June in the

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Frog saunas could help the amphibians cope with a deadly fungusfrog-saunas.jpg

Frog saunas could help the amphibians cope with a deadly fungus

Green and golden bell frogs used to be so common in Sydney, Australia that residents would find them hiding in their mailboxes and toilets. “They’d be everywhere,” says Anthony Waddle, a biologist at Macquarie University in Sydney. In the 1960’s though, the population started to slump. More recently, it’s plummeted. Surveys from the past 15

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